Truth and Reconciliation: Resources

Books & Other Written Resources

 

Books about Pow Wows

 

TitleAuthorAge/GradeComments
Jingle DancerCynthia Leitich Smith4 +Describes how a child wants to honor a family tradition by jingle dancing at the next powwow. Where will she find enough jingles for her dress?
The GatheringTheresa Meuse4-7Alex is attending her first Mi’Kmaw spiritual gathering, and learns about the traditional Mi’Kmaw culture along the way. She also finds her voice in the talking circle 
Pow Wow Dancing with Family Perry Smith K-gr. 3

Drumming, singing, and dancing are all part of being at a Powwow. Perry and his family travel all over North America to participate in these family and community gatherings

“This informative resource will support studies of Indigenous culture, history, traditions, community, art, and family lifestyle. Additional educational pages provide further information on powwows, traditional regalia, and dances.”

ASHA My First Pow Wow Dance Jocelyn L. Mackenzie3-8Invites young readers to join in the joy and excitement of traditional Indigenous dancing and culture.
Powwow: A Celebration through Song and DanceKaren Pheasant Neganigwane9-12The author describes the protocols, regalia, songs, dances and even food you can find at powwows from coast to coast, as well as the important role they play in Indigenous culture and reconciliation
Long Powwow Nights

David Bouchard, Leonard Paul (illustrator)  & 

Buffy St. Marie (CD)

8-12Takes you on a wonderful journey honoring mystical dancers who keep their traditions alive through dance and song.

 

Books and Other Reading for Adults

Search online for the following to gain access to many different sites/links, titles:

 

TitleAuthorComments
Call Me IndianFred SadkamooseChurch Library
Sacred FeathersDonald B. SmithA biography of The Reverend Peter Jones (Kahkewaquonaby) and the Mississauga Indians.
Our Home and Treaty Land

Matthew Anderson & 

Ray Aldred

Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Summary Report – 94 Calls to Action (PDF)T & R CommissionImportant to read
The Inconvenient IndianThomas KingVery helpful in understanding historical developments leading up to today’s situations & status in Canada & US
Treaty # 9John LongRead pages 315-378 in particular
Residential Schools Righting Canada’s WrongsMelanie FlorenceVery informative. A lot of detail about Indigenous Peoples culture and lifestyle before and after the introduction of Residential Schools
21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian ActBob JosephA quote from The Doctrine of Discovery says “….systemic racism is in the laws of Canada”. The book (21 Things….) illustrates how that statement may be true and begs the question…..”should the Indian Act be repealed?”
BirdieTracey LindbergOngoing political issue of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
Indigenous WritesChelsea Vowelexplores Indigenous experience from time of contact to present
Indigenous Relations: Insights, Tips, Suggestions to Make Reconciliation a RealityBob and Cynthia Joseph“Excellent primer for everyone who wants to embark on a new journey of reconciliation and collaboration with Indigenous peoples, but don’t know where – or how -to begin. critical importance of how to build bridges between peoples of different backgrounds” –
Five Little IndiansMichelle GoodFictional stories of residential school survivors written by a native woman; available as an e-book from Mississauga Library
Indian in Cabinet – Speaking Truth to PowerJody Wilson-RaybouldInteresting story about growing us as an Indigenous Canadian, serving as a Native leader in B.C. and her role with portfolios in the Trudeau 2015 govt.
They Called Me Number OneBev SellarsBiography of a residential school survivor; number one refers to how she was addressed at the school; available as an e-book from Mississauga Library
In My Own MoccasinsHelen KnottBiography of a residential survivor; battles the typical demons common to survivors; available as an e-book from Mississauga Library
FirewaterHarold JohnsonAlcohol and the Indian written by a Native man who experienced both excess and abstinence; available as an e-book from Mississauga Library
All Our Relations Tanya TalagaThe experience of aboriginal peoples after the arrival of Europeans; included are natives of North America, Brazil, Australia and Scandinavia; available as an e-book from Mississauga Library
The Survivors SpeakT & R CommissionPublished by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and available from their website; the title explains it all
Canadian Geographic Atlas of Indigenous Peoples 3 part series

Goodminds.com

canadiangeographic.ca

Indigo, Amazon

Forward by Ry Moran

First Nations, Indigenous, Metis – available at Indigo and Amazon – history***

 

Books and Online Resources for Youth

Rossland Public Library Indigenous Book Titles List

Vancouver Public Library Indigenous Book Titles List

Strong Nations: contact@strongnations.com 

 

Search online for the following to gain access to many different sites/links, titles:

  1. Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools
  2. Indigenous Youth Book Titles

 

TitleAuthorAge/GradeComments
Seven Fallen FeathersTanya TalagaMissing Indigenous youth in Thunder Bay and “investigations”

 

Books and Online Resources for Children

Rossland Public Library Indigenous Book Titles List

Vancouver Public Library Indigenous Book Titles List

Strong Nations: contact@strongnations.com 

 

Search online for the following to gain access to many different sites/links, titles:

  1. Indigenous Books for Toddlers
  2. Indigenous Books for Preschoolers
  3. Indigenous Children Picture Books
  4. Canadian Aboriginal Books for Schools

 

TitleAuthorAge/GradeComments
Stolen WordsM. Florence6-9A little girl helps her grandfather find his language (Cree) again
When We Were AloneDavid A. Robertson6-8A little girl notices things about her grandmother and asks questions in which her grandmother shares her experiences
With Our Orange HeartsPhyllis Webstad3-5Listening is a first step towards reconciliation
The Honour DrumCheryl Bear & Tim Huff0-12Introduces children to the First Nations, Inuit and Métis living in Canada
The Eagle FeatherDakelh CarrierGr. 4-10story about respecting those that live life with integrity
Phyllis’ Orange ShirtPhyllis Webstad4-6True story and story behind Orange Shirt Day and the message, “Every Child Matters”
I am Not a Number

Jenny Kay Dupuis & 

Kathy Kacer

7-11is about a child who is sent to a Residential School and returns –it explores where she will hide and what will happen when her parents disobey the law
We are Water ProtectorsCarole Lindstrom3-6Church Library
Shi-Shi-EtkoNicola I. CampbellGr. 1-10Church Library
My Heart Fills with HappinessM. Gray SmithBoard bookChurch Library
Minegoo MnikuSandra L. DodgeChurch Library -Mi’kmaq Creation Story
Sky SistersJan Bourdeau Waboose3+

Church Library

story captures the childhood experiences of two sisters as they appreciate their Northern environment

On the Trapline

David A. Robertson and 

Julie Flett

4-8

Church Library

heartfelt story about memory, imagination and intergenerational connection

Not My GirlChristy Jordan-Fenton6-9Sequel to the picture boom, “When I Was Eight”
Trudy’s Healing StoneTrudy Spiller4-6Learning to process feelings with the help of Mother Earth
The Sharing CircleTheresa Meuse4-8Stories about First Nations Culture – seven stories which explore First Nations cultural practices, beliefs and heritage
Jingle DancerCynthia Leitich Smith4 +Describes how a child wants to honor a family tradition by jingle dancing at the next powwow. Where will she find enough jingles for her dress?
The GatheringTheresa Meuse4-7Alex is attending her first Mi’Kmaw spiritual gathering, and learns about the traditional Mi’Kmaw culture along the way. She also finds her voice in the talking circle 
Pow Wow Dancing with Family Perry Smith K-gr. 3

Drumming, singing, and dancing are all part of being at a Powwow. Perry and his family travel all over North America to participate in these family and community gatherings

“This informative resource will support studies of Indigenous culture, history, traditions, community, art, and family lifestyle. Additional educational pages provide further information on powwows, traditional regalia, and dances.”

ASHA My First Pow Wow Dance Jocelyn L. Mackenzie3-8Invites young readers to join in the joy and excitement of traditional Indigenous dancing and culture.
Powwow: A Celebration through Song and DanceKaren Pheasant Neganigwane9-12The author describes the protocols, regalia, songs, dances and even food you can find at powwows from coast to coast, as well as the important role they play in Indigenous culture and reconciliation
Long Powwow Nights

David Bouchard, Leonard Paul (illustrator)  & 

Buffy St. Marie (CD)

8-12Takes you on a wonderful journey honoring mystical dancers who keep their traditions alive through dance and song.

 

Videos

DJ Shub – Indomitable ft. Northern Cree Singers (Official Video): An Indigenous man’s journey to, and experience in, a Pow Wow.

30th Three Fires Homecoming Pow Wow: Clips from the Pow Wow held by the Mississaugas of the Credit. 

Pow Wow Dancing Styles and Meanings

Theland Kicknosway is breathing new life into Indigenous dance — and it’s healing his entire family

What’s a Pow Wow? 

Indigenous Conversations Indian 101 with Carolyn King

 

Truth & Reconciliation Study Group Resource Archive

Link to come

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